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Kevin Martin Gets Respect ... From Somewhere Else

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From Bill Simmons's annual trade value column (where Kevin Martin is discussed):

My favorite possibly available trade piece -- great contract, proven scorer, high hoops IQ, someone who'd thrive on a veteran team that protected him defensively and ran plays for him. Right now he's playing on a glorified pickup team with Tyreke Evans, who thinks "point guard" means "I get to dribble over midcourt." Not gonna fly. Someone like Martin is a luxury. You pamper him. You set him screens. You hook him up on slash-and-kicks. You go to him after games and say, "Hey, what's the best place to deliver the ball for you -- chest high and a little to the right?" He could absolutely be a contender's No. 1 scoring option like Reggie Miller or Rip Hamilton once upon a time. Stay tuned.

It's amazing to me that Bill Simmons -- a national writer who has no reason to puff up Sacramento or Martin, and in fact in the past has taken care to poke at Kings fans as well as the front office's decision-making -- can publish such a glowing review of our player ... all while the organization which has Martin employs a man (Grant Napear) who tears Martin down repeatedly.

And not only does the organization allow it, the organization ignores it. The team has not once defended Martin publicly in the face of Napear's attacks. That's the real problem I have. If the Kings want to let Napear continue both jobs, fine. But Martin has done nothing wrong, and at least deserves some public defense from his coach, his team president, his owners. I dare say that in 29 other NBA cities a player as classy and productive as Martin would get that benefit. In 29 other cities, I think there's a good chance the general manager gets on the radio to defend their player, or at least talks to the dude privately.

Not here.

(Of course, the team has really never promoted Martin as a player in any meaningful way, despite his talent, so maybe I shouldn't be so surprised its turning a blind eye to the in-house sabotage.)