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By the numbers: 2015 NBA Draft Shooting Guard Prospects

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Tommy Gilligan-USA TODAY Sports

This is the fourth of a five part series in which I analyze the 2015 NBA Draft by position. As a source I used DraftExpress's mock draft and for statistics I used both DraftExpress and Sports-Reference. All statistics used are for the prior college basketball season. Because of the lack of advanced statistic information and difference in playstyle for international leagues, I have only included NCAA players in this analysis. For information such as player position, school, height, etc. please click on the player's name and it will take you to their DraftExpress page with all that information.

The Sacramento Kings have been trying to address their Shooting Guard position for a couple years now, drafting Ben McLemore and Nik Stauskas in back-to-back years.  While McLemore showed a lot of improvement last year, neither Ben or Stauskas has been able to play consistently enough to inspire confidence in their ability to man the position long term.

While that may change given more playing time and experience, the Kings want to win now and they're still looking for depth at the position.  However, there doesn't appear to be a solution for this problem in the draft, at least not this year.

Basic Stats:

Name Class MPG PPG FG% 3P% FT% TRB APG STL BLK TOV PF
Devin Booker Fr. 21.5 10.0 .470 .411 (58/141) .828 2.0 1.1 0.4 0.1 1.0 1.5
R.J. Hunter Jr. 37.0 19.7 .395 .305 (80/262) .878 4.7 3.6 2.1 1.0 2.2 2.4
Andrew Harrison So. 25.5 9.3 .378 .383 (36/94) .792 2.2 3.6 1.0 0.2 1.6 1.8
Michael Frazier Jr. 29.2 12.1 .417 .380 (57/150) .871 4.1 1.4 1.2 0.1 1.8 1.7
Michael Qualls Jr. 30.2 15.9 .436 .333 (55/165) .775 5.3 1.7 0.9 0.5 1.7 1.7
Norman Powell Sr. 34.6 16.4 .456 .319 (38/119) .751 4.7 2.1 1.8 0.4 2.2 2.5
Rashad Vaughn Fr. 32.3 17.8 .439 .383 (54/141) .694 4.8 1.6 0.8 0.3 2.2 2.3
J.P. Tokoto Jr. 29.1 8.3 .428 .375 (12/32) .615 5.6 4.3 1.5 0.3 2.2 2.4
Joseph Young Sr. 36.7 20.7 .448 .357 (91/255) .925 4.4 3.8 1.1 0.0 2.4 1.4
Josh Richardson Sr. 36.3 16.0 .461 .359 (46/128) .798 4.5 3.6 2.1 0.5 2.7 2.5
Pat Connauaghton Sr. 35.6 12.5 .466 .423 (93/220) .781 7.4 1.5 0.7 0.9 1.2 2.0
Aaron Harrison So. 25.7 11.0 .395 .316 (59/187) .782 2.6 1.4 1.1 0.2 0.9 1.6
Treveon Graham Sr. 29.4 16.2 .428 .381 (64/168) .691 7.1 1.6 0.6 0.3 1.2 2.0
Dez Wells Sr. 30.5 15.1 .464 .510 (25/49) .806 5.3 2.8 1.0 0.4 3.3 2.3
D.J. Newbill Sr. 37.1 20.7 .450 .370 (61/165) .758 4.7 3.1 1.3 0.2 2.6 2.1
Chasson Randle Sr. 36.4 19.6 .403 .363 (90/248) .877 3.3 3.0 1.4 0.1 2.0 2.2
Terran Petteway Jr. 35.0 18.2 .396 .313 (68/217) .711 4.9 2.8 1.1 0.9 3.4 3.0
Corey Hawkins Sr. 33.4 20.9 .503 .488 (81/166) .822 4.9 3.4 1.4 0.2 3.0 1.9

Advanced Stats:

Name PER TS% FTR ORB% DRB% AST% STL% BLK% TOV% USG% ORtg DRtg Team SoS
Devin Booker 19.4 .600 .223 2.6% 7.8% 10.9% 1.3% 0.3% 10.4% 22.8% 123.1 92.2 31st
R.J. Hunter 25.8 .552 .447 2.8% 12.5% 20.3% 3.6% 3.6% 11.0% 29.6% 115.4 95.5 161st
Andrew Harrison 18.0 .531 .596 1.7% 8.1% 26.0% 2.5% 0.9% 15.7% 21.4% 115.2 89.2 31st
Michael Frazier 18.7 .585 .298 3.7% 14.0% 10.9% 2.6% 0.3% 14.6% 22.6% 111.6 96.3 6th
Michael Qualls 21.7 .562 .494 6.0% 14.2% 10.9% 1.7% 1.6% 10.7% 25.3% 117.5 102.1 63rd
Norman Powell 19.6 .540 .362 1.9% 13.3% 12.8% 3.2% 1.5% 12.8% 25.3% 107.4 99.8 23rd
Rashad Vaughn 20.2 .547 .299 2.3% 13.7% 11.8% 1.5% 1.1% 11.8% 30.8% 103.6 100.4 101st
J.P. Tokoto 15.9 .484 .432 6.4% 14.3% 24.0% 2.9% 1.3% 20.7% 17.9% 103.8 98.1 1st
Joseph Young 23.2 .568 .223 1.7% 11.6% 21.3% 1.8% 0.1% 11.7% 28.7% 115.4 106.2 40th
Josh Richardson 22.9 .560 .311 2.9% 13.2% 24.4% 3.8% 2.0% 15.7% 25.5% 112.9 103.1 38th
Pat Connaughton 19.4 .615 .180 4.2% 20.4% 7.6% 1.3% 2.7% 10.2% 17.7% 122.1 101 54th
Aaron Harrison 17.9 .514 .273 1.9% 9.2% 11.1% 2.7% 0.6% 7.7% 23.6% 115.1 88.3 31st
Treveon Graham 25.2 .546 .450 8.0% 20.5% 12.7% 1.2% 1.1% 7.2% 27.6% 118.8 99.1 48th
Dez Wells 21.1 .559 .407 5.5% 14.2% 23.7% 2.1% 1.6% 19.6% 30.1% 104.0 97.6 52nd
D.J. Newbill 23.7 .551 .383 3.4% 11.0% 21.7% 2.1% 0.6% 12.4% 30.4% 111.6 102.3 60th
Chasson Randle 22.5 .559 .423 1.0% 9.7% 18.8% 2.3% 0.4% 10.4% 27.9% 118.1 104.0 44th
Terran Petteway 19.0 .512 .387 1.9% 14.8% 22.4% 2.0% 3.1% 15.9% 33.3% 96.9 97.2 45th
Corey Hawkins 30.1 .653 .420 2.9% 14.8% 25.3% 2.7% 0.7% 15.8% 32.2% 121.7 99.9 222nd

Analysis:

There aren't too many top-flight shooting guards in the draft this year.  Perhaps the highest rated is Kentucky's Devin Booker, who has drawn comparisons to Klay Thompson for his sweet shooting stroke.  However, Booker hasn't proven to be much of anything aside from a spot-up shooter so far, although that is a skill the Kings could use.  Booker wasn't much of a passer or rebounder, and his low free throw rate indicates an inability to get to the rim.

R.J. Hunter is one of the most physically gifted guards in the draft and has some of the best steal and block rates among all guards.  He's also a good passer, while turning the ball over minimally.  Where Hunter struggles however is consistency on offense, where he's a notoriously streaky shooter;  His 3P% of 30.5% was his lowest in three years at college.  Fortunately for Hunter, he won't be asked to do as much on an NBA team and if he works on his consistency he could be a fantastic 3-and-D player. I personally feel he has more upside than Booker, mainly because of his defensive ability and physical tools.

The Harrison twins of Kentucky got a lot of exposure in their two years at school, and both had a penchant for hitting big shots.  However they're both very streaky shooters, offering sub-40% FG%.  Andrew handled the ball a lot and as such had a high assist rate.  Both twins will need to become much more consistent shooters if they hope to play in the NBA.  Andrew has more of a shot thanks to his ball-handling ability and better outside shot, where he can fill the role of combo-guard off the bench.

Notre Dame's Pat Connaughton is an excellent shooter, but doesn't offer much else, especially on defense.  One of the most surprising players in terms of statistics is UC Davis' own Corey Hawkins, who posted some absolutely monster numbers, including 48.8% from the three point arc.  He also had one of the higher assist rates of this group.  The problem with Hawkins however is that he was able to play four years, and all four years came against weak competition. He's also a 6'2 shooting guard, meaning he'll probably have to work on his distribution skills and become a scoring PG if he hopes to have a chance in the NBA.  While I don't think Hawkins will get drafted, I do think his shooting and playmaking ability is worth a look in Summer League and training camp.

Coming Tomorrow: Point Guards