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NBA Draft 2015 Scouting Profile: Frank Kaminsky

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The 7'1 shooting star from Wisconsin highlights our continuing NBA Draft coverage; Kaminsky would add much that the Kings lack, but would they draft him over other higher-ceiling players?

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Frank Kaminsky

NBA Position: PF/C

General Information: 22 year old Senior, played at Wisconsin. From Lisle, Illinois.

Measurables: 7'0.75", 231 lbs, 6'11″ wingspan, 9'1.5″ standing reach

2013-14 Season Statistics: 18.8 PPG, 8.2 RPG, 2.6 APG, .8 SPG, 1.5 BPG, 1.6 TOPG (33.6 minutes per contest) - 54.7% FG, 78% FT, 41.6% 3P, 62.8% TS%.

Summary: The leader of the Wisconsin powerhouse that came up short in the 2015 Championship, Kaminsky is a gifted offensive player who fits the new NBA mold as a play-making big man, with a great shooting ability, court awareness, and ball control. He will be limited defensively with less than great length and a serious need for more muscle, but he's a tough competitor with good footwork and defensive awareness. While he may be closer to his ceiling than the classes' younger players, Kaminsky offers great offensive versatility and a well-rounded set of skills for a player of his size.

Offensive Breakdown: There aren't many players with Kaminsky's 7'1 size that can shoot at his level; Frank the Tank shot 45.5% on 2-point jumpers (38.3% of his total offense, according to Hoop-Math.com) and 41.6% from three. He's deadly with his feet set, and with his size and semi-quick release he can get the shot off before defenders can get at the ball. While Kaminsky's three-point shooting should be well respected, he only took 101 threes on the season. This isn't a high volume (only 20.7% of his shots were from three), but he presents the option for a team to utilize his long-range shooting in a bigger offensive role.

His post-game won't be as immediate a threat in the NBA, but Kaminsky has a solid array of post moves and developed excellent footwork. His 230 pounds of muscle was enough for a college big man, but he'll find himself outmuscled against many NBA power forwards, so he'll need to continue to bulk up if he's going to be utilized in the paint. He had trouble finishing in post-up situations against length, so he'll have to adjust to the NBA game and find out what he can and can't do. He wasn't ever a huge offensive rebounding threat, as his shooting kept him outside of the paint on 59% of his shots, and his 1.5 a game (5.8% offensive rebounding rate) is the lowest among first round big men.

Kaminsky is a capable passer and doesn't make many mistakes with the basketball - he has a 2.6/1.6 assist to turnover ratio, and his 18.4% assist rate and 9.8% turnover rates are both tops among the classes big men AND ahead of many of the guards. Wisconsin's offense wasn't fast, but it relied on precision and control; Kaminsky was the best scoring option, but was also a very unselfish player and looked to get his teammates involved as much as possible. This speaks to his ability at the NBA level - while he may not emerge as a top scorer, he can be a huge part to the offense.

He won't be the fastest or the strongest big man on the court, he does have good mobility and is comfortable attacking the basket from the perimeter. In the National Championship against Duke, he beat Jahlil Okafor off the dribble a number of times. He knows his limitations but isn't a stiff player - his quickness and mobility continue to highlight his offensive versatility. He can shoot, he can score in the post, he can attack the basket, and he can move the ball.

Defensive Breakdown: There are concerns about Kaminsky's defensive transition, centering around his lack of muscle and smaller than average wingspan (6'11). Over the final two years of his collegiate career, Kaminsky showed a lot of defensive development, going from a skinny liability to a smart, aware defender. He was never a lockdown stopper and offers little as a rim protector, but motivation is not a problem and he's worked hard to minimize his deficiencies.

While Kaminsky will be an excellent small ball center on the offensive end, he can't be expected to guard NBA centers consistently when he'll struggle to outmuscle most power forwards as it is. His mobility will help him, and his 7'1 frame will as well, but he doesn't have the explosiveness nor the needed length. I expect he'll end up an average defender, but one who doesn't struggle with motivation, just with what he can do against stronger, faster opponents.

Kaminsky did work hard on the defensive glass, improving from 4.2 defensive rebounds a game as a junior to 6.7 his senior year (and a jump from 18.4% rate to 25.7%). Again, his lack of muscle and smaller wingspan are concerning, but he showed a willingness to box out with any big man and effort was never a problem.

Intangibles: Came into Wisconsin as a skinny shooter, and leaves the program four years later as the most complete player in the Draft class. He was the leader of one of the more dangerous teams in the country over the past two years and proved himself as a tough, high motor player. Even if you believe Kristpas Porzingis/Willie Cauley-Stein will be better players by the end of their rookie seasons, Kaminsky is far too skilled a player not to be in the conversation. He may be closer to his ceiling than some of the classes big men, but his versatility, basketball IQ and floor leadership will all be immediate transferable skills.

Fit with Sacramento: He may not excite the fanbase in a way that Cauley-Stein, Justice Winslow, Porzingis or Emmanuel Mudiay might, but Kaminsky would add much that the Kings still lack; shooting, play making ability, high basketball IQ, and more shooting. He can attack the defense in a number of ways, and his spacing would help clear up room for DeMarcus Cousins. He'd also be able to play the center in small ball lineups, which would create a mismatch offensively when most centers aren't mobile enough to keep up with him.

This comparison feels lazy, because they aren't perfect matches based on skill, but Kaminsky could have a similar impact on a team like Brad Miller; perhaps never on the same level that Miller did for the 2003-2006 seasons, but somewhere close. Kaminsky is fall less of a stiff than Miller was, and I think Miller was more of a quiet enforcer on the block and on the boards, but Frank will present a similar offensive versatility and can impact the game in every aspect.

Kaminsky's ball-handling and passing skills add to his spacing ability; opponents will have to respect his shooting range, but if someone rotates when they shouldn't Kaminsky can find the open teammate. Plus, if a big man closes out on him too quickly, Kaminsky can attack the basket. He has been unfairly hit with a low-ceiling label, but he's an exceptionally versatile offensive weapon for a player his size and will fit in as a new-age playmaking PF.

As always, check out the DraftExpress breakdowns;