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By the numbers: 2015 NBA Draft Power Forward Prospects

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Robert Hanashiro-USA TODAY Sports

This is the second of a five part series in which I analyze the 2015 NBA Draft by position. As a source I used DraftExpress's mock draft and for statistics I used both DraftExpress and Sports-Reference. All statistics used are for the prior college basketball season. Because of the lack of advanced statistic information and difference in playstyle for international leagues, I have only included NCAA players in this analysis. For information such as player position, school, height, etc. please click on the player's name and it will take you to their DraftExpress page with all that information.

Power Forward is a position the Kings haven't particularly had a lot of strength in since perhaps Shareef Abdur-Rahim's pre-injury days.  Jason Thompson is the long-time incumbent, beating out almost all the competitors brought in to replace him.  Carl Landry is supposed to provide depth but hasn't been able to stay on the court enough to be effective.

To make things more complicated, new head coach George Karl eschewed using a traditional PF for much of the last part of the season, playing Rudy Gay at the 4 along with spot minutes for Omri Casspi.

PF might just be one of the deepest positions in this draft, although only a few would probably be considered worthy of a lottery pick.  Regardless, let's take a look at the numbers.

Basic Stats:

Name Class MPG PPG FG% 3P% FT% TRB APG STL BLK TOV PF
Frank Kaminsky Sr. 33.6 18.8 .547 .416 (42/101) .780 8.2 2.6 0.8 1.5 1.6 1.7
Bobby Portis So. 29.9 17.5 .536 .467 (14/30) .737 8.9 1.2 1.1 1.4 1.6 2.2
Trey Lyles Fr. 23.0 8.7 .488 .138 (4/29) .735 5.2 1.1 0.5 0.4 1.1 1.6
Kevon Looney Fr. 30.9 11.6 .470 .415 (22/53) .626 9.2 1.4 1.3 0.9 1.3 2.9
Montrezl Harrell Jr. 35.1 15.7 .566 .243 (9/37) .597 9.2 1.4 0.9 1.2 2.0 2.1
Jonathan Holmes Sr. 26.1 10.3 .389 .331 (43/130) .778 6.1 1.1 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.2
Christian Wood So. 32.7 15.7 .497 .284 (25/88) .736 10.0 1.3 0.3 2.7 2.4 2.6
Jarell Martin So. 35.1 16.9 .509 .269 (14/52) .690 9.2 1.8 1.2 0.7 2.8 2.8
Chris McCullough Fr. 28.1 9.3 .478 1.000 (1/1) .563 6.9 1.1 1.7 2.1 2.2 2.6
Jordan Mickey So. 34.9 15.4 .504 .111 (1/9) .646 9.9 1.3 0.9 3.6 3.3 2.6
Rakeem Christmas Sr. 34.3 17.5 .552 .000 (0/1) .712 9.1 1.5 0.9 2.5 2.5 3.4
Richaun Holmes Sr. 28.8 14.7 .563 .419 (18/43) .712 8.0 0.8 0.7 2.7 1.9 2.5
Cliff Alexander Fr. 17.6 7.1 .566 .000 (0/0) .671 5.3 0.4 0.2 1.3 1.0 2.0
Aaron White Sr. 31.5 16.4 .521 .356 (21/59) .819 7.3 1.4 1.3 0.5 1.2 1.6
Chris Walker So. 14.6 4.7 .538 .000 (0/3) .386 3.5 0.1 0.3 1.2 1.0 2.0
Vince Hunter So. 28.5 14.9 .526 .400 (4/10) .602 9.2 1.7 1.2 1.0 2.8 3.0
Cady Lalanne Sr. 29.0 11.6 .552 .167 (3/18) .636 9.5 0.3 0.6 1.9 2.5 2.7
Larry Nance Sr. 34.9 16.1 .514 .333 (14/42) .786 6.2 2.5 1.2 1.2 2.3 2.2
Brandon Ashley Jr. 27.8 12.2 .514 .333 (12/36) .703 5.2 0.7 0.6 0.7 1.4 2.8
Darion Atkins Sr. 23.9 7.6 .511 .000 (0/1) .520 6.0 0.7 0.8 1.1 1.1 2.0
Branden Dawson Sr. 30.1 11.9 .535 .000 (0/0) .490 9.1 1.7 1.2 1.7 1.9 2.1
TaShawn Thomas Sr. 29.7 11.6 .519 .000 (0/3) .691 6.5 1.5 0.6 1.5 1.9 2.1

Advanced Stats:

Name PER TS% FTR ORB% DRB% AST% STL% BLK% TOV% USG% ORtg DRtg Team SoS
Frank Kaminsky 34.4 .628 .410 6.0% 25.7% 18.4% 1.7% 4.5% 9.8% 28.6% 129.6 92.6 4th
Bobby Portis 29.5 .582 .335 13.6% 20.2% 8.8% 2.1% 4.8% 9.4% 26.7% 122 96.9 63rd
Trey Lyles 19.8 .543 .425 9.9% 16.1% 9.2% 1.4% 2.1% 12.4% 20.8% 115.9 86.3 31st
Kevon Looney 21.9 .532 .458 12.2% 21.0% 9.1% 2.5% 3.3% 10.3% 19.7% 116.5 97 23rd
Montrezl Harrell 24.8 .588 .508 10.0% 19.1% 9.2% 1.6% 3.7% 12.9% 22.3% 117.4 90.3 15th
Jonathan Holmes 19.5 .520 .367 10.5% 15.8% 9.0% 1.3% 4.1% 12.9% 23.1% 111.5 95 21st
Christian Wood 25.5 .572 .434 10.4% 22.8% 9.2% 0.6% 8.2% 14.8% 26.6% 109.9 93.5 102nd
Jarell Martin 21.6 .565 .511 9.7% 18.1% 10.5% 1.9% 1.8% 15.7% 24.8% 109.8 94.2 76th
Chris McCullough 18.9 .508 .628 9.0% 18.5% 8.2% 3.6% 8.5% 19.3% 20.7% 95.7 88.6 37th
Jordan Mickey 21.7 .533 .388 10.5% 19.6% 7.6% 1.5% 9.6% 18.4% 25.0% 99.7 90.2 76th
Rakeem Christmas 26.5 .591 .519 10.2% 19.6% 10.5% 1.7% 8.5% 14.5% 25.8% 113.6 92.5 37th
Richaun Holmes 30.4 .625 .522 11.6% 20.9% 7.2% 1.5% 11.2% 14.1% 25.6% 119.6 92.7 187th
Cliff Alexander 23.2 .612 .612 13.3% 19.9% 5.4% 0.6% 7.7% 14.4% 20.1% 118.2 95.0 2nd
Aaron White 29.3 .633 .726 7.7% 18.5% 10.2% 2.6% 1.7% 8.5% 23.5% 133.9 94.2 33rd
Chris Walker 16.0 .518 .370 11.0% 18.7% 1.0% 1.4% 9.4% 18.6% 20.7% 93.1 91.9 6th
Vince Hunter 25.8 .554 .595 11.6% 25.9% 14.3% 2.7% 3.8% 17.2% 30.5% 104.6 89.2 175th
Cady Lalanne 20.8 .582 .572 13.5% 23.4% 2.4% 1.2% 6.4% 20.1% 21.3% 104.8 98.7 70th
Larry Nance 25.3 .581 .403 6.0% 21.1% 20.0% 2.3% 4.3% 14.0% 28.5% 109.6 90.6 186th
Brandon Ashley 19.6 .574 .533 8.4% 14.5% 4.7% 1.3% 2.7% 12.0% 22.5% 116.2 92.5 39th
Darion Atkins 20.6 .515 .226 12.1% 18.7% 6.6% 2.3% 5.8% 13.1% 20.7% 106.6 83.6 27th
Branden Dawson 23.8 .533 .306 11.9% 23.5% 12.2% 2.5% 6.3% 14.7% 23.4% 106.6 91.1 5th
TaShawn Thomas 20.0 .553 .399 8.5% 14.9% 10.4% 1.3% 5.3% 15.7% 21.3% 108.6 93.0 9th

Analysis:

Wisconsin's Frank Kaminsky, College's Player of the Year, is definitely worthy of the accolades he received in his final year and was a key reason why Wisconsin nearly won the National Title.  Kaminsky's four years at Wisconsin provided him with a lot of polish, and it shows in his numbers.  Kaminsky's PER of 34.4 is higher than anyone else in the draft and was the highest in college basketball last season and for good reason as Kaminsky can do a bit of everything.  He's an efficient scorer, both in the post and from long range, where he nailed a very solid 41.6% of his three point jumpers.  He also posted a fantastic assist rate of 18.4%, showing his ability to make plays for others out of the post.  His defensive rebound rate of 25.7% was also second best at his position and better than most of the eligible centers as well.  That's a surprise given that his defensive rebound rate in his first two years of college hovered around a measly 12%, which is abysmal for a big man and was just 18.4% his junior year.  While Kaminsky may not have the same ceiling as others in the draft, he is probably one of the few players that can come in and make an impact right away.  Defensively, he'll probably have some issues as he's not a rim protector and isn't as quick laterally as you'd like, but he provides a big body and a good understanding of the game.  Kaminsky's a safe pick for those who want impact, and there's no question that he'd be a good fit offensively for the Kings with his shooting and passing ability.

Bobby Portis is another intriguing player, a very efficient offensive player that also can stretch the floor.  While not as good of a defensive rebounder as some of his peers, he excels on the offensive glass and finishing off of putbacks.  Portis definitely has more question marks than Kaminsky however, especially regarding his aggressiveness.  His Free Throw rate of .335 is pretty low for a big man, which often suggests that he either avoids contact or settles for jumpers.  Defensively, Portis has the size and athleticism to be a good defender but isn't a rim protector.

Trey Lyles has gotten a lot of hype in the draft but the numbers don't suggest an excellent prospect.  Perhaps he was overshadowed by Towns and Cauley-Stein but Lyles doesn't stand out in any one area.  Lyles has some nice tools, including the ability to drive the ball and shoot from the perimeter (although he's not ready to start draining NBA threes), but he'll need time to develop.

UCLA's Kevon Looney is another player that will need time, although he does possess some NBA-ready skills in both his shooting and rebounding.  Looney will need to bulk up to play PF in the NBA however, as he already wasn't very efficient offensively against smaller and weaker college players, scoring just 47.0% of his shots, the lowest number among his peers (and due for a downtick against NBA competition).

Few other prospects excite me.  Montrezl Harrell hasn't lived up to the potential of his first two seasons but has continued to show he's an able defender, hustle player and efficient scorer.  However most of his offense is created by others and he's not as good of a rebounder as others.  Larry Nance (not the former Suns and Cavs star) is the best passer of the bunch and Vince Hunter is the best rebounder.  Richaun Holmes provides a measure of floor spacing and rim protection and could be a solid second-round pick.  Holmes was the MAC Defensive Player of the Year, and given his growing offensive versatility, looks to be a draft sleeper.

Coming Tomorrow: Small Forwards